Teaching@Sydney

Welcome to Teaching@Sydney. Stay informed about teaching and learning news and events with this monthly bulletin produced by the Institute for Teaching and Learning.

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Keynote speaker announced for Sydney Teaching Colloquium

Dr Tim Soutphommasane is Australia's Race Discrimination Commissioner and commenced his five-year appointment on 20 August 2013. Prior to joining the Australian Human Rights Commission, he was a political philosopher and held posts at The University of Sydney and Monash University. His thinking on multiculturalism, national identity and patriotism has been influential in shaping debates in Australia and Britain.

Dr Soutphommasane is the author of four books, I’m not racist but … (2015), The Virtuous Citizen (2012), Don't Go Back To Where You Came From (2012), and Reclaiming Patriotism (2009). He was co-editor (with Nick Dyrenfurth) of All That's Left (2010). He has been an opinion columnist with The Age and The Weekend Australian newspapers, and in 2013 presented the documentary series Mongrel Nation on ABC Radio National.

A first-generation Australian, Dr Soutphommasane was raised in southwest Sydney. He completed a Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Philosophy (with distinction) at the University of Oxford, and is a first-class honours graduate of The University of Sydney.

For those interested in the correct pronunciation of Dr Soutphommasane’s surname, the phonetic spelling of it is Soot-pom-ma-sarn.

For more about the Sydney Teaching Colloquium visit the website
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Dr Tim Soutphommasane is Australia's Race Discrimination Commissioner and commenced his five-year appointment on 20 August 2013. Prior to joining the Australian Human Righ...[more]

Sydney Teaching Colloquium - Call for proposals

Cultural Competence is everyone's business

For our students and graduates to ‘work productively, collaboratively and openly in diverse groups and across cultural boundaries’[1], we need to embed cultural competence in teaching and curriculum. This year's colloquium explores issues and solutions in meeting this challenge. We will partner with industry representatives and national thought leaders to discuss the topic, and share insights from Sydney staff and students. Join us to explore what cultural competence means for you. How might we assess and give feedback on students' cultural competence? How do we develop cultural competence in our research students and research spaces? What do the professions really want from our graduates? And what do we bring to the table in terms of our own identities and experiences?

The colloquium builds on the aims and work of the university’s National Centre for Cultural Competence and the Wingara Mura – Bunga Barrabugu (‘thinking path to make tomorrow’) Strategy, and recognises that many staff have been researching and doing curriculum work in this space for some time. Cultural Competence is strongly featured in the Developing a distinctive undergraduate education discussion paper, released in June.

Call for Proposals

Staff presentations are a key element of the colloquium, and we welcome a range of proposal types across all domains of university learning (undergraduate, postgraduate coursework and research higher degrees) that address any one of the themes below:

  1. Embedding cultural competence in teaching and curriculum
  2. Assessing and giving feedback on students' cultural competence
  3. Learning in culturally diverse groups - Knowing ourselves, knowing our students
  4. Developing cultural competence in our research, and our research students
  5. Work-integrated and service-learning for cultural competence

To find out more about submitting a proposal, please visit the Colloquium website

All proposals are due by 11.59pm on Friday 4 September.
 

[1] Developing a distinctive undergraduate education discussion paper, p.12[close]

Cultural Competence is everyone's business For our students and graduates to ‘work productively, collaboratively and openly in diverse groups and across cultural boundar...[more]

OLT grant and fellowship successes will benefit university

The OLT has recently announced the successful Round 1, 2015 grants and the 2015 Fellows. DVC Education, Professor Pip Pattison announced the successes to the University.

Warmest congratulations to:

Adam Bridgeman for his National Teaching Fellowship:
Personalising learning using diagnostic and success data for large cohorts

The Fellowship, Adam says, will build on the successful approach to personalising the first year experience developed in Chemistry and the Faculty of Science at Sydney and take the next step in the pedagogy of transition using technology-enabled learning, learning analytics and diagnostic testing. Adam’s awareness that the first year experience is pivotal for student success, retention and progression as it shapes the approaches to learning that students adopt and attitudes towards the disciplines, already has had an impact in the Faculty of Science. He notes:  Technology-enabled teaching and support has the potential through the practical implementation of learning analytics to individualise learning and personalise the student experience. The Fellowship program will build on and expand the transition framework through the facilitation of approaches that embrace and share expertise in technology and the use of data.

Warmest congratulations to the University of Sydney successful applicants for grants.

Now that the OLT grants are Category One, they are even more highly sought after and contested. Nine grants were awarded this round, two of them to Sydney.  

Simon Barrie, with Tai Peseta, Keith Trigwell and Peter McCallum and team for their grant of $349 000:
Reframing the PhD for Australia's future universities

Tai Peseta comments on how the project reflects University of Sydney priorities.

We know from the release of the first strategy paper on research that the University is keen for a conversation about the nature of the PhD as well as the learning experiences which comprise it. Our project started from a concern we had about the quality of teaching preparation for PhD candidates. As we began to explore this, we realised that there are already innovative models of teaching preparation in the PhD across the world. We didn’t feel the need to add to that repertoire of strategies. Instead, we wanted to focus on how we might use the existing learning contexts in the PhD – like supervision, disciplinary communities, even the research project and thesis itself – to support the work of ‘teaching preparation’ – and vice versa. For us, the potentially exciting element of the project is that it could point to a radically different PhD learning experience, at Sydney and elsewhere.

Gabrielle Russell-Mundine and Joseph Cavanagh of the NCC and their team for a grant of $435,000:
An interdisciplinary model and resources for culturally competent service learning in Aboriginal community controlled organisations

Gabrielle welcomes the initiatives which mean that: The University of Sydney is building opportunities for students to have a unique experience of working with Aboriginal peoples and their communities. We have learnt from many Aboriginal peoples and their communities that this necessitates student openness to appreciate that there are many ways of knowing, being and doing that are different to their own. Our aim is to make sure that all who participate in this project will gain many learning outcomes that they will value throughout their lives. This project will assist students and staff to build their cultural competence skills on their life long journey towards being a globally effective and culturally safe practitioner and will transform the service learning experience by developing a new way of building interdisciplinary partnerships between Aboriginal industry partners and the University.

Read more about the fellowship and grant projects here.

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The OLT has recently announced the successful Round 1, 2015 grants and the 2015 Fellows. DVC Education, Professor Pip Pattison announced the successes to the University. Warmest c...[more]

MOOCs: What have we learned? - Daphne Koller presents a Sydney Ideas Talk

Nearly four years since the first MOOCs (massive open online courses) were offered by Stanford University, MOOCs are now offered by hundreds of top universities, to tens of millions of learners worldwide. MOOCs are no longer an experiment: the learning, reach, and value they offer are now a reality.

Professor Pip Pattison, Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Education) will be introducing Daphne Koller, the Co-Founder and President of Coursera, who will discuss how MOOCs present opportunities for open-ended projects, intercultural learner interactions, and collaborative learning.

Professor Koller will also provide an insight to MOOCs learning analytics and showcase the transformative impact that can be derived from providing millions of people with access to the world’s best education.

About the speaker

Daphne Koller is the President and co-founder of Coursera, a social entrepreneurship company that works with the best universities to connect anyone around the world with the best education, for free. Koller was recognized as one of Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People for 2012, Newsweek’s top 10 most important people in 2010, Huffington Post's 100 Game Changers for 2010, and more. Prior to founding Coursera, Koller was the Rajeev Motwani Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University, where she served on the faculty for 18 years. In her research life, she worked in the area of machine learning and probabilistic modeling, with applications to systems biology and personalized medicine. She is the recipient of many awards, which include the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, the ACM/Infosys award, and membership in the US National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is also an award winning teacher, who pioneered in her Stanford class many of the ideas that underlie the Coursera user experience. She received her BSc and MSc from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and her PhD from Stanford in 1994.

Date: Wednesday 12 August
Time: 4.30pm - 5.30pm

For further details, and to register click here
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Nearly four years since the first MOOCs (massive open online courses) were offered by Stanford University, MOOCs are now offered by hundreds of top universities, to tens of million...[more]

Seeking student ambassadors for Sydney Teaching Colloquium

Please pass on this opportunity to your students - it's paid work and great experience.

The Sydney Teaching Colloquium (STC) is one of the biggest events on the University’s teaching and learning calendar. Attended by over 300 staff, the STC is a forum for sharing ideas and practices, learning about research, and finding collaborators interested in improving teaching, learning and curriculum at the University

The Colloquium is now in its fifth year. This year, the STC will be held on Wednesday 4th November in the Charles Perkins Centre. We invite applications from currently-enrolled undergraduate students to participate in the colloquium as Student Ambassadors. These are paid positions, and we are seeking to appoint six students as Ambassadors.

For more information please click here
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Please pass on this opportunity to your students - it's paid work and great experience. The Sydney Teaching Colloquium (STC) is one of the biggest events on the University&rsq...[more]

#edtech talks - 21 & 28 August

In August, we have two #edtech talks. 

On Friday 21st August , the STELTH (Sydney Technology Enhanced Learning & Teaching in Health) group will host an #edtech session, with Dr Vanessa Hughes and Dr Kate Edwards. 

Dr. Vanessa Hughes, Sydney Nursing School will speak about Smart Sparrow: Using learning analytics to measure student engagement in case based learning. Vanessa is a Senior Lecturer in Bioscience in the Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery. She is an early adopter of technology and has received several teaching awards recognizing her efforts in using technology to foster deeper learning and student engagement. In her talk, Vanessa will discuss how using Smart Sparrow has enabled her to construct online case based learning modules that enable nursing students to connect bioscience theory with clinical practice. She will discuss how learning analytics have helped her to understand her students learning behavior and how this has enabled her to improve her teaching and provide more meaningful formative feedback to her students.  

Dr Kate Edwards, Faculty of Health Sciences will present on The use of video rubrics for assessor training. Kate is a Senior Lecturer in Exercise Physiology in the Faculty of Health Sciences. In 2014 she won the FHS Early Career Teaching Award for her work leading a large cohort in the fundamentals of exercise science unit. In particular she has developed a subject specific, online Excel course and integrated Excel worksheets for the blending of software skills in basic science. In this talk, she will discuss the innovative development of multimedia rubrics for practical skills assessments. This cutting edge work combines media use to improve teaching and moderation in multi-examiner settings, as well as improving tools for student feedback.

Date: Friday 21 August
Time: 12-1pm

To register click here


On Friday 28 August, Professor Eric Tsui presents Blended Learning and MOOCs: PolyU's Journey.

This talk will outline the blended learning efforts, emergence and current development of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). In particular, the impact on higher education, on personal learning, and various ways to sustain these efforts will be discussed. In May 2014, HKPolyUX became a contributing member of MIT's edX platform. This presentation will also outline PolyU's preparation and journey to MOOCs. Separately and in addition to the above, PolyU is also part of the consortium of HK universities which have been awarded a large theme-based grant by the University Grants Committee (UGC) HK to develop a mega-MOOC platform called KEEP and PolyU's role is to develop a personalisation engine to recommend courses to learners on the KEEP platform.

Appointed as the Professor of Knowledge Management at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University under the President’s Distinguished Professionals Scheme in September 2002, Professor Tsui joined the university as a full time staff member in March 2005. Eric is Vice President of the Hong Kong Knowledge Management Society, an honorary advisor on Knowledge Management to the Hong Kong Police College and the Efficiency Unit, and a member on IT Technical Advisory Sub-Committee in the Hong Kong Hospital Authority. Prior to joining the University, Professor Tsui had several industry roles, including Chief Research Officer, Asia Pacific for Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) as well as Innovation Manager at Australian Mutual Provident (AMP) and Maybank in Malaysia. PRofessor Tsui has received several teaching awards, and in 2015 was rated by Terrapinn (Singapore) as one of the Top 50 Influencers in Education in the Asia Pacific.

Date: Friday 28 August
Time: 12-1pm

To register click here
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In August, we have two #edtech talks.  On Friday 21st August , the STELTH (Sydney Technology Enhanced Learning & Teaching in Health) group will host an #edtech session, w...[more]

New sharing feature in the unit of study survey system

There's a new feature in the unit of study survey (USS) system that allows unit of study coordinators to give permission to other staff members to either view USS results (e.g. for Semester 1 surveys recently completed), and/or track response rates whilst a survey is open (e.g. for upcoming intensive or Semester 2 surveys).

This might be helpful for those who have a co-coordinator, or that wish to share information with other teachers contributing to the unit e.g. lecturers, tutors, demonstrators.

To enable this, the coordinator needs to:

  1. Go to the USS Reports webpage and login; THEN
  2. (a) Click on the share icon (image) to the right of the unit name in the list of reports, OR
    (b) Click on the share icon (image) in the top right collection of icons when they have a report open; THEN
  3. Fill in the information on the box that pops up (image).

To share quantitative results tick 'report', to share qualitative results tick 'comment', and to share the tracking of response rates whilst a survey is open tick 'tracking'.

To view reports the staff member given permission/s needs to login here.

To view response tracking the staff member given permission needs to login here.

If you have any queries or issues with this feature, please contact Dr Brad Ridout who is the Surveys Officer in the ITL via email or 9351 3725.
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There's a new feature in the unit of study survey (USS) system that allows unit of study coordinators to give permission to other staff members to either view USS&nbs...[more]

How to survive your PhD - new MOOC for students & supervisors

If you supervise doctoral students, or you are one yourself, you may be interested in a new MOOC 'How to survive your PhD'. It's intended mainly for students, but also for supervisors and families. You can watch a video trailer for the MOOC here . The MOOC starts on August 26th, and runs for 10 weeks, with two hours per week anticipated study time.

Between one-quarter and one-third of all research students never finish their degree. The PhD is an emotional journey as much as it is an intellectual one.  The MOOC will help participants understand the common emotional experiences of research students and why they tend to have emotional issues in common; create strategies and approaches to help research students cope with the emotional challenges of research study; and will help academics and prospective academics become more effective research supervisors.

By directly addressing the emotional issues, and by helping participants see the connections between emotional resilience and success, this course aims to help create a more supportive academic environment, where students can do their best research work.

If you are interested in further details, the MOOC's creator, Dr Inger Mewburn, describes the process of creating the MOOC in this blog post.[close]

If you supervise doctoral students, or you are one yourself, you may be interested in a new MOOC 'How to survive your PhD'. It's intended mainly for students, but also...[more]

Conferences - Academic Integrity, ISSoTL and AARE

Crossing the borders: new frontiers for academic integrity is the title of the 7th Asia Pacific Conference on Educational Integrity, the APFEI biennial conference  which will be hosted this year hosted by Charles Sturt University, 16-18 November 2015.

It is more urgent than ever that new educational approaches to academic integrity be imagined, so that new frontiers and opportunities for teaching and learning can minimise risk and ensure our academic standards. In Australia, for instance, the Tertiary Education and Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA) requires that Higher Education providers have policies and processes in place to demonstrate academic quality assurance. Within these guidelines, providers must demonstrate evidence of effective implementation of systematic processes at all levels to maintain academic integrity and to prevent misconduct. The conference focus on the new frontiers of academic integrity is therefore extremely topical, as universities are increasingly pressured to show evidence of their management and promotion of academic integrity.

In keeping with the conference theme of new frontiers, this is the first time that an APFEI conference will be held in rural Australia rather than in a major city. Additionally, many opportunities will be provided for online participation by distance or transnational delegates. 

For more visit: www.7apcei.com

Leading Learning and the Scholarship of Change is the theme of the 12th annual conference of the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning which will take place from 27-30 October 2015 in Melbourne, Australia. The conference will be co-hosted by Monash University and RMIT University and held at RMIT University, located in the central business district of Melbourne. At this major international conference, you will have the opportunity to hear from, and interact with, scholars of teaching and learning from around the world. The conference theme, Leading Learning and the Scholarship of Change, will explore how teaching staff and students in universities can lead quality learning and teaching practice as we move inevitably towards more changes in higher education. You will be able to interact with colleagues and build networks that will enable you to participate actively in the distributed leadership of the academy.

For more visit: http://www.issotl2015.com.au/

The  2015 annual Australian Association for Research in Education (AARE) Conference will be held in Fremantle at the University of Notre Dame Australia. The AARE conference brings together researchers from across the world, as well as Australia, who work in diverse educational fields. The Association’s wide range of Special Interest Groups (SIGs) gives a sense of this diversity. The conference is a space within which both well established and early career academics can find a forum to provoke debate, stimulate discussion, offer new ideas and encourage the dissemination of research findings. Alongside the main conference, opportunities are also provided to meet journal editors and book publishers, to participate in workshops and to develop SIG initiatives.

For more visit: www.aareconference.com.au[close]

Crossing the borders: new frontiers for academic integrity is the title of the 7th Asia Pacific Conference on Educational Integrity, the APFEI biennial conference  which will...[more]

53 Powerful Ideas All Teachers Should Know About

The pick this month from Graham Gibb's blog is Idea 31 - that 'Much learning is acquired by doing, but seldom only by doing'. Gibbs describes learning from experience as a multi-cycle phenomenon, involving a continuous cycle of theory, planning, doing and reflection - do you agree?

Graham Gibbs is one of the UK's most well known advocates of improving university learning and teaching. With his colleagues (Habeshaw & Habeshaw), he was responsible for the very popular '53 Interesting Ideas' books series that have supported countless teachers (new and experienced) navigate their way through tricky classroom and curriculum dilemmas. Gibbs's new blog 53 Powerful Ideas all Teachers Should Know About offers a research summary of key issues.[close]

The pick this month from Graham Gibb's blog is Idea 31 - that 'Much learning is acquired by doing, but seldom only by doing'. Gibbs describes learning from ex...[more]

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Current Events & Registration

register Sign up for Teaching@Sydney details 2014
closed Foundations of Research Supervision Forum details 2 September
register OLT Grants Workshop details 16 September
register #edtech talks: Dr James Edwards and Catherine Smyth details 18 September
register Principles & Practice of University Teaching & Learning details 1 - 2 October
register Sydney Teaching Colloquium 2015 details 4 November

closed #edtech talks: Professor Eric Tsui presents Blended Learning and MOOCs: PolyU's Journey details 28 August
closed #edtech talks: Dr. Vanessa Hughes & Dr Kate Edwards details 21 August
closed #edtech talks: Learning to Teach Online MOOC study group details 14 August
closed #edtech talks: Learning to Teach Online MOOC study group details 7 August

August 15
July 15
June 15
May 15
April 15
March 15
February 15
December 14
November 14
October 14
September 14