Call for proposals

This year, we are seeking proposals from the university community. We welcome a range of proposals types across all domains of university learning (undergraduate, postgraduate coursework and research higher degrees) that address any one of the themes below.

All proposals are due by 11.30pm on Friday 25 July.

  1. Colloquium themes
  2. Preparing your proposal
  3. Submitting your proposal

1. Colloquium themes

Six themes form the focus for this year’s Colloquium:

  • Assessment that engages students in learning that is relevant to the disciplinary, professional and community contexts
  • Assessment tasks, practices and processes designed to integrate student learning across units, and across disciplinary, community and professional contexts
  • Approaches to assessment in which students and staff participate in discussions about criteria and standards
  • Approaches to assessment that demonstrate how students can use feedback for future learning
  • Ways of enhancing thesis examination, processes and practices
  • Innovative examples of departmental, school, or faculty approaches to using assessment data for curriculum change and renewal

2. Preparing your proposal

This year, the 2014 Sydney Teaching Colloquium welcomes three distinct proposal types.

  • Practice example
  • Research and evaluation
  • Symposia

For each proposal type, we invite you to submit a 300 word abstract. Each abstract will be peer reviewed according to a set of criteria by members of the Colloquium Organising Committee.

Proposals that are collaborations between students, academics, and professional staff are especially welcome.

Practice examples

Practice examples are 45 minutes long, and the abstract (300 words max) should address the following:

  • What is the assessment problem/challenge/puzzle from your teaching context or practice that is the focus? Locate your ‘challenge’ in relation to one of the colloquium themes.
  • What idea, theory, framework or model has helped you to re-think the assessment problem you have identified?
  • What happened when you applied your renewed idea about assessment to your teaching practice and/or to your students’ learning? What evidence did you collect, and what conclusions did you draw from the evidence?
  • What would you do differently next time, and why?

Practice examples should focus on supporting others (ie, those who attend your presentation) to learn from your experience, and to consider its application to their own context. The abstract should make clear how the allotted 45 minutes provides opportunities for active audience engagement and discussion. As a guide, it is expected that at least 20 of the 45 minutes will be allocated to an activity designed to foster participation.    

Research and evaluation

Research and evaluation presentations at the Colloquium have been allocated 45 minutes. The abstract (300 words max) should address the following:

  • What is the assessment problem/challenge/puzzle from your teaching context or practice that is the focus of your presentation? Locate your ‘challenge’ in relation to one of the colloquium themes
  • What scholarly ideas, theories, frameworks or models helped you to re-think the assessment problem you have identified?
  • Describe the research/evaluation project you carried out.
  • What were the main findings/outcomes of your research, and how have they contributed a new/different/nuanced understanding of the assessment problem you identified?

The focus of research and evaluation presentations is on the findings/outcomes of the research or evaluation project you carried out, and how these have supported changes to your assessment practice and students’ learning. The abstract should make clear how the allotted 45 minutes provides opportunities for active audience engagement and discussion. As a guide, it is expected that at least 15 minutes (of the 45 minutes) is allocated to an activity designed to encourage participation.    

Symposia

Symposia are 90 minutes and must address one of the colloquium themes. Symposia can include a combination of practice examples, and research and evaluation presentations (no more than three). We encourage cross-disciplinary presentations as well as those comprising a mix of teaching/professional staff and students. One abstract (300 words max) should be submitted that describes the following:

  • What is the assessment problem/question addressed in the symposium?
  • What scholarly ideas, theories, frameworks or models are drawn on in the symposium to address the assessment problem identified?
  • In what way does each presentation offer a different approach to the assessment problem?
  • What conclusions are likely to be made about the assessment problem identified? 

Symposia are intended to offer multiple perspectives on a common assessment challenge/issue. The abstract should make clear how the allotted 90 minutes provides opportunities for active audience engagement and discussion.

Please note that any references cited in the abstract will be included in the final word count.

3. Submitting your proposal

All proposals are due by 11.30pm on Friday 25 July. When your proposal is ready to be submitted, click here.

Questions about the 2014 Sydney Teaching Colloquium can be directed to members of the Colloquium Organising Committee or to liaison staff in the Institute for Teaching and Learning: Dr Tai Peseta or Dr Graham Hendry.