Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What is the purpose of the Feedback for Teachers Service?
  2. Which feedback strategy will gather the information I need?
  3. How do I order student feedback forms?
  4. When will I receive my forms?
  5. What will be included in the package of information I receive from the ITL?
  6. What happens when the ITL receives the completed questionnaires?
  7. When will I receive my student feedback questionnaires and report?
  8. Are there any guidelines which can help me interpret my student feedback report?
  9. How much does the ITL charge for this service?
  10. Who can I talk to if I have a question about the ordering and administration of my survey forms, or the processing of my report?
  11. I cannot decide which survey forms I need, or I would like to design my own questionnaire. Is there anyone who can assist me?
  12. Who can I talk with about interpreting my results, curriculum review and institutional level teaching evaluation?
  13. Can you recommend some good texts on becoming a better teacher?

 

2. Which feedback strategy will gather the information I need?

The Feedback for Teachers Service offers a range of feedback strategies to help staff reflect and improve on their teaching. If you are unsure which strategy will best suit your needs please contact Jennifer Ungaro on 9351 3725 to discuss this. The strategy you use will depend mainly on your purpose for seeking feedback. If you are going to use a questionnaire, there are various types to choose from. Go to the section on Student Feedback Questionnaires and read the information in the section headed 'Find out about the questionnaires' to help you make a decision.


 

7. When will I receive my student feedback questionnaires and report?

The ITL is committed to returning all questionnaires and reports within two weeks of the release of student examination results at the end of each semester. This date can vary between faculties.


 

8. Are there any guidelines which can help me interpret my student feedback report?

Yes. Click on Acting on Feedback from your Students. This contains guidelines for interpretation and outlines a plan of action for acting on student feedback.


 

9. How much does the ITL charge for this service?

This service is provided free of charge to all staff of the University of Sydney.


 

10. Who can I talk to if I have a question about the ordering and administration of my survey forms, or the processing of my report?

The Teaching Evaluation Service Administrative Officer is the Administrative Officer responsible for all the data entry for the Teaching Evaluation and Enhancement Service. She can answer your questions about placing an order for a survey or tracking down a Feedback for Teachers report. Call her on 9351 4821.


 

11. I cannot decide which survey forms I need, or I would like to design my own questionnaire. Is there anyone who can assist me?

Brad Ridout is the ITL’s Survey Officer. Call him on 9351 3607 if you have queries about the various surveys, or would like to consider alternative teaching evaluation methods.


 

12. Who can I talk with about interpreting my results, curriculum review and institutional level teaching evaluation?

Brad Ridout is the ITL's Survey Officer responsible for the administration and reporting of the ITL’s teaching evaluation surveys. He can answer your questions about the analysis and reporting of these surveys. Call him on 9351 3607. Simon Barrie is the academic who leads the ITL's Evaluation and Quality Assurance project. He can answer your questions about institutional level teaching evaluation, the SCEQ, university policy and the development of the ITL's service. He can also assist staff and faculties in interpreting and responding to teaching evaluation results and in planning research in this area. Call him on 9351 5814.


 

13. Can you recommend some good texts on becoming a better teacher?

All of the following texts are available through University of Sydney libraries:

Bain, K. (2006). What the best college teachers do. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Biggs, J.B. (2003). Teaching for quality learning at university. Open University Press: Buckingham.

Erickson, B.L, Peters, C.B., & Strommer, D.W. (2006). Teaching first-year college students. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Kember, D., & McNaught, C. (2007). Enhancing university teaching: Lessons from research into award-winning teachers. London: Routledge. This text has accompanying on-line resources   

Marsh, H.W., & Roche, L.A. (1994). The use of students’ evaluations of university teaching to improve teaching effectiveness. Canberra: Australian Government Publishing Service. (See Appendix 5 for a range of Targeting Teaching Strategies.)

McKeachie, W. (2002). McKeachie's teaching tips: Strategies, research, and theory for college and university teachers. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co.

Prosser, M. and Trigwell, K. (1999). Understanding learning and teaching: The experience in higher education. Buckingham: Open University Press.

Ramsden, P. (2003). Learning to teach in higher education. London: Routledge.

Ramsden, P., & Dodds, A. (1989). Improving teaching and courses: A guide to evaluation. Melbourne: University of Melbourne.